What Is A Bus In Music Production?

What Is A Bus In Music Production
I am grateful to you, kind benefactor! Because to your generosity, Wikipedia is able to continue to thrive. You can choose to “hide appeals” to prevent this browser from displaying fundraising messages for one week, or you can return to the appeal to make a donation if you are still interested in doing so.

  1. Please, we beg you, do not scroll away from this page. Hi.
  2. Let’s cut to the chase and get to the point: On Thursday, we will be asking for your assistance in maintaining Wikipedia.98% of those who read our site do not donate.
  3. Many people have the intention of donating later, but they end up forgetting.

To ensure our continued existence, all we ask for is $2, or anything else you can provide. We beg you, in all modesty, to refrain from scrolling away from this page. If you are one of our very few donors, please accept our sincere gratitude. In the field of audio engineering, a bus (alternative spelling: buss; plural: busses) is a signal path that may be used to combine (sum) several audio signal paths together.

Busses can also be referred to by their singular form, bus. Typically, it is used to aggregate many separate audio tracks into a single entity that may then be modified as a group in the same manner as another track. On a mixing console, this may be accomplished by physically routing the signal through the use of switches and cable patching.

Alternatively, this can be accomplished through the manipulation of software capabilities on a digital audio workstation (DAW). The use of busses enables the engineer to operate in a manner that is both more efficient and more consistent. For example, the engineer may apply sound processing effects and alter levels for many tracks at the same time using busses.

What is the difference between an AUX and a bus?

A “bus” is a point in the flow of a signal when many signals are added together to form a combined signal. This completes the summary. A track is referred to as a “aux” if it enables the user to pass bused signals and process those signals, but it does not let the user to enter audio or MIDI clips into the track.

What is a bus when mixing?

One or more audio selections can be “routed” to a specific location using a mix bus, which is a method for sending audio. Some frequent destinations or places to route audio include aux sends, subgroups, and your main L/R mix. You will first send the channels or audio that you want to the bus that you select (Aux Send, Main L/R, VCA, etc.), and then you will send that signal to the destination that you want by increasing the level of the faders or knobs that are associated with the channels that are contained within that bus.

  1. Mix Bus is a phrase that is used in the realms of live sound and recording.
  2. It is usually related with output channels and busses, as was covered in the previous section.
  3. One of the most significant benefits that comes with having access to a number of different busses is the ability to change a number of different sources or channels with just one “group” fader.

Watch this video to learn how to use the Subgroup feature (also known as the bus) on a DL Series mixer. Proceed to the blog.

What is a 2 bus in mixing?

A: In the language of audio engineers and producers, the main stereo or 2-channel output from a mixing console is referred to as the 2-bus (not the 2-buss; that term refers to something quite else). The phrase is now also used to refer to summing boxes, virtual mixers, and other similar devices.

What is a 4 bus mixer?

#1 The following groups have been archived: rec.audio.pro (Am I missing something?) When I look at mixers, I find that there are both 4-buss and 8-buss mixers available. What exactly are some of the buss’s applications? Are those the outputs for the mains and monitors on the amplifier? I consider myself to be an amateur, and I would need some explanation.

  1. Thanks Jul 20, 2004 205 0 18,830 0 #2 Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More information?) CPT Boy wrote: When I’m looking at mixers, I notice advertisements for both 4 bus and 8 bus mixers.
  2. What exactly are some of the buss’s applications? Are these the outputs for the monitors and mains that go to the amplifier? In the broadest sense, a buss can be understood to be a signal route.

When a maker of mixers describes their product as a “4 bus” or a “8 buss,” they are often referring to the number of subgroups the mixer has. It is possible that the manufacturer will also count the master out and any auxiliary sends as busses in some cases.

  1. Yamaha is the only brand that immediately comes to mind that is capable of doing this.
  2. They will refer to their console as having a “12 bus.” They are counting the main out, as well as the four subgroups, the six aux sends, and the main out.
  3. Despite the fact that it is accurate in a technical sense, it is rather deceptive.

When describing a console in the past, it was usual practice to simply count the subgroups as busses. However, this is no longer the case. If this is the case, then perhaps the question you have in mind is, “What are sub-groups?” A number of channels may often be combined onto a single sub-group fader through the utilization of sub-groups.

  1. It is possible that all of the background vocal channels will be combined into a single sub-group.
  2. If you required more or less backing vocals, you would just have to alter one fader instead of having to adjust three distinct faders, because you would only have one fader to adjust.
  3. You are able to utilize the subgroups as sends to the amplifiers, however this is not a really useful function.

In most cases, the subgroups will be sent through to the primary output of the console. – Eric Improve Your Mixing Abilities with Multi-Track Masters Available on CD-ROM Through the Website Raw-Tracks.com #3 The following groups have been archived: rec.audio.pro (Am I missing something?) There are going to be a lot of replies that are superior to this one, but here are some of them: When talking about electronics in general, a “bus” refers to any circuit that is shared by several other circuits.

An example of this would be something called a power bus, which allows several independent circuit blocks or modules to share the same power source. Within the context of a mixer, output signal busses are extremely common and serve the purpose of facilitating sub or “group” mixing. This is accomplished by allowing a group of channel outputs to be mixed together and the level of the whole group to be controlled with a single fader, all the while preserving the individual balance between channels.

It is very common and highly handy for lighting control boards to include group assignment busses and faders. This enables one to build up a scene that is made of multiple faders, and then manage both the scene itself and the relative levels within it with just one fader.

Does that make sense? Even if you have more than one person assisting you at the console, it can be very difficult or even impossible to control the levels of a large number of faders all at once, such as when you are doing a drum mix or a scene mix for the lights. Groups and subs save you from having to deal with this challenge.

In point of fact, many years ago, it was not unusual to have two or three humans operating faders during a mix as a form of human automation. This was typical practice in the audio industry. Because of the prevalence of digital audio work stations, events like these mix parties are no longer required.

  1. Skler CPT Boy sent the following news tip via the mail system: [email protected]
  2. When I look at mixers, I find that there are both 4-buss and 8-buss mixers available.
  3. What exactly are some of the buss’s applications? Are these the outputs for the monitors and mains that go to the amplifier? I consider myself to be an amateur, and I would need some explanation.

Thanks #4 The following groups have been archived: rec.audio.pro (Am I missing something?) In the post, [email protected] says: When I’m shopping for mixers, I find that there are both 4 bus and 8 bus mixers marketed. What exactly are some of the buss’s applications? Are these the outputs for the monitors and mains that go to the amplifier? First of all, “bus” is spelled correctly since it comes from the word “omnibus,” which is a vehicle that carries many different items.

  1. A bus is a place where a number of different inputs are combined into a single output.
  2. It has a minimum of one input and a minimum of one output.
  3. What you put into the input determines how you use the outcome that you get.
  4. A modern recorded or live sound mixer will often have many busses available for use.

After the pan pots, there will be a primary stereo bus that sends a mix of the input signals to either the recorder or the power amplifiers. There might be many auxiliary busses, each of which carries a different combination of channels depending on how much its respective auxiliary send controls are set up.

In most cases, the term “4-bus” or “8-bus” mixer refers to the number of subgroup busses that are included in the device. It is possible to allocate a channel to one of these busses rather than immediately connecting it to one of the main stereo outputs. They can be used either independently, such as to send a mix of all the drums out to a compressor, or the busses can be added to the main stereo bus mix.

This allows you to control the volume in the main mix of, for example, all the drums, or all the keyboards, or all the background vocals, with one or two faders while maintaining the balance among them that you set with the main channel faders. Alternatively, they can be used to send a mix of all the drum – My true name is Mike Rivers, and my email address is [email protected] The following groups have been archived: rec.audio.pro (Am I missing something?) When did you Americans start caring about whether or whether you spelled things correctly, anyway? AlanW (UK) #6 The following groups have been archived: rec.audio.pro (Am I missing something?) This page was last updated at Mon, 06 Sep 2004 16:13:22 GMT, CPT.

Boy stated that he is a bit of a newbie and would need some clarity on the topic. According to what I’ve been informed, all of the most recent mixers are outfitted with open-topped, double-decker buses. Whooo doggies!!! AlanW #7 Rec.audio.pro group posts that have been archived (More information?) CPT sent an email to [email protected] (AlanW1, UK) at 20:33:41 GMT on Sunday, September 5, 2004.

[email protected] (AlanW1, UK) wrote: Boy stated that he is a bit of a newbie and would need some clarity on the topic. According to what I’ve been informed, all of the most recent mixers are outfitted with open-topped, double-decker buses. Whooo doggies!!! AlanW If you’re going to bring expressions like “Whooo doggies!” into this conversation, at least save them for the new high-speed Greyhound buses that are being utilized in the cutting-edge supermixers.

😉 Jim #8 The following groups have been archived: rec.audio.pro (Am I missing something?) Mike Rivers wrote: First of all, “bus” is spelled correctly since it comes from the word “omnibus,” which is a vehicle that carries many different items. For the sake of elucidating this idea, the Mackie handbook referred to the phrase “Get on the bus.” Mike, did you write all of that? 🙂 #9 The following groups have been archived: rec.audio.pro (Am I missing something?) CPT Boy authored the following: “When I look at mixers, I observe that there are promoted 4buss and 8buss mixers.” What exactly are some of the buss’s applications? Are these the outputs for the monitors and mains that go to the amplifier? I consider myself to be an amateur, and I would need some explanation.

Thanks Now that you have a better understanding of how to spell it. A bus is a shared channel that several channels can be mixed into. Two input channels and one output bus would make up the most basic form of mixer that’s feasible. They would go into a Left bus and a Right bus, also termed, as a pair, a stereo bus, if you had a stereo mixer (and you’d probably have a few more inputs).

  1. If you had a mono mixer, they would go into a mono bus.
  2. The stereo bus, often known as main on most mixers, is a common feature.
  3. You also have the option of taking additional buses, which are referred to as group (or subgroup) 1-4 or 1-8.
  4. Then, there are “assign” switches on each channel, which allow you to link that channel to any bus or buses (Group 1-8 and/or L and R).
See also:  How To Save Video With Music On Instagram?

These are generally always allocated in pairs, and the Pan knob fades between the left and right channels as well as the even and odd channels. The volume of these buses is determined by the primary fader for the Channel. In addition to having faders, the Group buses are also able to be allocated to the Stereo bus.

  1. This enables you to place a collection of channels into a bus, and from the one fader for the bus, you can adjust the volume of the entire group.
  2. A channel has the ability to transfer data to not just the main bus but also the Aux bus, the Effects bus, and the Monitor bus.
  3. You have more control over them, distinct from (and often even independently of) the main channel faders, thanks to the fact that they employ pots rather than switches to adjust the values.

The mixer provides outputs for every one of these buses. You can mix the choir mics (however many you have, say four mics) into Groups 1 & 2 (panned to become Choir Left and Right), the saw section (maybe six of them) into Group 3, and the banjos (four more) into group 4, and you can adjust the balance for each input at its channel and the level of each track at the Group.

  • This can be done by connecting the inputs of your 4-track recorder to the outputs of the Groups 1 through 4.
  • Alternatively, if you are providing live sound for the same orchestra, you may assign all four groups to the main stereo bus, and then those signals will be sent to the house speakers.
  • You won’t need to grasp all six saw mics to adjust the volume because this offers you control over each part individually.

The Monitor bus outputs are where the monitors would originate from. Therefore, a mixer that advertises itself as having 56 inputs, 8 group outputs, and 2 main outputs (L and R) has 56 inputs, 8 group outputs, and 2 main outputs. Monitor and Auxiliary buses are often counted in a manner distinct from one another. The following groups have been archived: rec.audio.pro (Am I missing something?) This page was last updated at Mon, 06 Sep 2004 16:13:22 GMT, CPT. Boy authored the following: “When I look at mixers, I observe that there are promoted 4buss and 8buss mixers.” What exactly are some of the buss’s applications? Are those the outputs for the mains and monitors on the amplifier? I consider myself to be an amateur, and I would need some explanation.

Thanks In reality, it is an abbreviation for busbar. When it comes to the power industry, a large, thick piece of copper is what transfers electricity to or from the various circuits. This copper can come from a variety of different sources. In the field of audio, it refers to a circuit that carries the combined signals from a number of separate channels.

d Pearce Consulting may be accessed online at http://www.pearce.uk.com. #11 The following groups have been archived: rec.audio.pro (Am I missing something?) In the aforementioned piece, the author [email protected] mentions that a Mackie handbook previously instructed users to “Get on the bus” in order to describe this idea.

  1. Mike, did you compose that sentence? No, but I would have done it anyhow.
  2. A number of years ago, I believe that I published something similar to that as a paragraph heading for a post that was about console architecture in Recording.
  3. I’m very amazed.
  4. Mike Rivers ([email protected]) Nevertheless, many IP addresses are prevented from accessing this system until either the spam stops or Hell freezes over completely.

If you send me an e-mail and it gets returned to you, you may contact me here by using your secret decoder ring: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo #12 The following groups have been archived: rec.audio.pro (Am I missing something?) In a piece that Mike Rivers penned, he mentioned that the notion was explained in a Mackie handbook with the phrase “Get on the bus.” Mike, did you compose that sentence? No, but I would have done it anyhow.

A number of years ago, I believe that I wrote something quite similar to that as a paragraph heading for a post that was about console topology in Recording. It’s high-quality material. When the 1202 was initially released, I was by no means a novice in the field of audio production; but, at the time, I was responsible for the education of several sales personnel who had no prior expertise in the field.

Mackie’s material was always well written and simple to comprehend. #13 The following groups have been archived: rec.audio.pro (Am I missing something?) Mike Rivers wrote: There was a Mackie handbook that said, “Get on the bus,” to explain this notion.

  • This was stated in the article that was written by [email protected]
  • Mike, did you compose that sentence? No, but I would have done it anyhow.
  • When the 1202 was initially released, I was by no means a novice in the field of audio production; but, at the time, I was responsible for the education of several sales personnel who had no prior expertise in the field.

Mackie’s material was always well written and simple to comprehend. When I worked for Mackie a few years ago, I penned a lengthy book about analog mixers; but, due to the company’s cutbacks and subsequent reorganization, the book was never published. It was more generic in character, despite the fact that it did reference Mackie goods when it was appropriate to do so.

The idea was to create a brief, four-pager quick-start guide that was customized to each mixer. This guide would highlight the locations of all of the mixer’s knobs, switches, and jacks before referring the reader to the more comprehensive guide book. It would have been larger than an instruction manual, and as a result, it would have been viewed as having greater value; hence, it might not have been thrown away, but rather it would have been kept on the shelf for future reference.

I brought to Mackie’s attention the fact that they already possessed a large quantity of the instructional material that I had previously created, since I was aware that they were considering adding some lesson content to the TAPCO website. It took a significant amount of work, and it would be satisfying to witness its publication in some capacity or another.

  • We’ll see.
  • My true name is Mike Rivers, and my email address is [email protected]
  • Nevertheless, many IP addresses are prevented from accessing this system until either the spam stops or Hell freezes over completely.
  • If you send me an e-mail and it gets returned to you, you may contact me here by using your secret decoder ring: double-m-eleven-double-zero at yahoo #14 Rec.audio.pro group posts that have been archived (More information?) S O’Neill sent the following message in the news section: [email protected]: CPT Boy authored the following: “When I look at mixers, I observe that there are promoted 4buss and 8buss mixers.” What exactly are some of the buss’s applications? Are those the outputs for the monitors and mains that go to the amplifier? I consider myself to be an amateur, and I would need some explanation.

Thanks Now that you have a better understanding of how to spell it. A bus is a shared channel that several channels can be mixed into. The most basic configuration for a mixer would consist of two input channels and a single output bus. They would go into a Left bus and a Right bus, also termed, as a pair, a stereo bus, if you had a stereo mixer (and you’d probably have a few more inputs).

  1. If you had a mono mixer, they would go into a mono bus.
  2. The stereo bus, often known as main on most mixers, is a common feature.
  3. You also have the option of taking additional buses, which are referred to as group (or subgroup) 1-4 or 1-8.
  4. Then, there are “assign” switches on each channel, which allow you to link that channel to any bus or buses (Group 1-8 and/or L and R).

These are generally always allocated in pairs, and the Pan knob fades between the left and right channels as well as the even and odd channels. The volume of these buses is determined by the primary fader for the Channel. In addition to having faders, the Group buses are also able to be allocated to the Stereo bus.

  1. This enables you to place a collection of channels into a bus, and from the one fader for the bus, you can adjust the volume of the entire group.
  2. A channel has the ability to transfer data to not just the main bus but also the Aux bus, the Effects bus, and the Monitor bus.
  3. You have more control over them, distinct from (and often even independently of) the main channel faders, thanks to the fact that they employ pots rather than switches to adjust the values.

The mixer provides outputs for every one of these buses. You can mix the choir mics (however many you have, say four mics) into Groups 1 & 2 (panned to become Choir Left and Right), the saw section (maybe six of them) into Group 3, and the banjos (four more) into group 4, and you can adjust the balance for each input at its channel and the level of each track at the Group.

See also:  A Dynamic Accent Occurs In Music When A Performer?

This can be done by connecting the inputs of your 4-track recorder to the outputs of the Groups 1–4 on your recorder Alternatively, if you are providing live sound for the same orchestra, you may assign all four groups to the main stereo bus, and then those signals will be sent to the house speakers.

You won’t need to grasp all six saw mics to adjust the volume because this offers you control over each part individually. The Monitor bus outputs are where the monitors would originate from. Therefore, a mixer that advertises itself as having 56 inputs, 8 group outputs, and 2 main outputs (L and R) has 56 inputs, 8 group outputs, and 2 main outputs.

  • Monitor and Auxiliary buses are often counted in a manner distinct from one another.
  • Many thanks for the information on the bus’s definition! It was a great help in bringing certain things into better focus!!! #15 The following groups have been archived: rec.audio.pro (Am I missing something?) CPT Boy thanked the reader for providing the information about the definition of the bus.

It was a great help in bringing certain things into better focus!!! Do you like the way it’s spelled? 🙂

Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
Question Connect power mixer output to non power mixer input Audio Apr 3, 2022
Question Recording from mixer to Audacity via headphone jack Audio 2 Mar 20, 2022
D Question Halp~ It’s noise, it’s always noise. (PC/Console Mixer setup) Audio Oct 11, 2021
K Question Odd Audio Interference From Mixer Audio Aug 20, 2021
E Question Can you connect a FX2000 to A 1832usb mixer Audio Jul 30, 2021
R Question Mackie Mixer Mute button. Audio 2 May 22, 2021
Question Powered mixer Audio 1 Apr 22, 2021
Question Instruments to Mixer to Laptop to Livestream Audio Jan 24, 2021
N Solved! Looking for a stereo mixer for use with my audio setup. Audio 2 Oct 26, 2020
T Question Mixer with ps4 audio question Audio Sep 14, 2020
J Solved! Hi there! I have an audio Mixer question. Audio 1 Sep 12, 2020
A Solved! Can anyone help me troubleshoot my Mackie profx8v2 mixer Audio 1 Jun 10, 2020
U Question HELP connect mixer to camcorder Audio 2 Jun 4, 2020
Question need help connecting speakers to mixer to pc Audio 1 May 3, 2020
T Question Help!PS4 & Computer Audio into Mixer (Without Loopback) Audio Apr 28, 2020
D Question How do I hear PC sound with the Yamaha MG10XU? Audio 1 Mar 31, 2020
W Question Pc audio to mixer Audio 4 Feb 19, 2020
L Solved! hum from mixer Audio 4 Feb 17, 2020
J Question Mixer and interface problem Audio 1 Jan 26, 2020
I Question Mixer Buzzing from left channel only Audio 3 Jan 2, 2020

What is a bus in recording studio?

I am grateful to you, kind benefactor! Because to your generosity, Wikipedia is able to continue to thrive. Choose to “hide appeals” to prevent this browser from seeing fundraising messages for the next week, or return to the solicitation page if you are still interested in making a donation.

  1. Please, we beg you, do not scroll away from this page. Hi.
  2. Let’s cut to the chase and get to the point: On Thursday, we will be asking for your assistance in maintaining Wikipedia.98% of those who read our site do not donate.
  3. Many people have the intention of donating later, but they end up forgetting.

To ensure our continued existence, all we ask for is $2, or anything else you can provide. We beg you, in all modesty, to refrain from scrolling away from this page. If you are one of our very few donors, please accept our sincere gratitude. In the field of audio engineering, a bus (alternative spelling: buss; plural: busses) is a signal path that may be used to combine (sum) several audio signal paths together.

Busses can also be referred to by their singular form, bus. Typically, it is used to aggregate many separate audio tracks into a single entity that may then be modified as a group in the same manner as another track. On a mixing console, this may be accomplished by physically routing the signal through the use of switches and cable patching.

Alternatively, this can be accomplished through the manipulation of software capabilities on a digital audio workstation (DAW). The use of busses enables the engineer to operate in a manner that is both more efficient and more consistent. For example, the engineer may apply sound processing effects and alter levels for many tracks at the same time using busses.

What is aux track in music?

A track or channel in a DAW that performs a function that is analogous to that of an aux input on a physical mixer. It acts as a bus destination for the purpose of routing signals, including audio that was recorded on another track or tracks, as well as audio that is being input from an external source.

Do I need a mix bus?

EQ: Just so there is no confusion, the primary EQing has to be done on each track individually. It’s possible that various frequencies on each instrument require you to reduce or increase them. Utilizing the EQ on the mix bus is a useful method for making minor adjustments to a collection of tracks as a whole.

If you find that a collection of voice recordings, when played together, produce an overwhelming sensation, you may bus the vocal tracks to an EQ track and then reduce or enhance them. You may also apply a mix bus EQ if you feel like your cymbals are missing some sheen. Keep your motions on the mix bus to a minimum, as you should do with every other aspect of the mixing process.

A seemingly little shift in the frequency spectrum may have significant repercussions. Therefore, employ broader bands with more precise cuts (no more than 2 or 3 dB). This is not to do surgery; rather, it is to sculpt the tone. If it’s necessary, perform surgery on each individual track.

Is a mix bus the same as a master fader?

Extended explanation: The master fader on most analog boards is responsible for controlling the overall volume of all of the channels. In the meanwhile, the mix bus is a distinct collection of channels that may be utilized for a wide variety of purposes.

Should you EQ or compress first?

The time-honored method consists of: The traditional sequence of the equalizer coming first, followed by the compressor, is done so for a very good reason. If you have a signal that has spectral faults like strong resonances, you should begin by cleaning it up.

  • This is a good idea in general.
  • When it comes to equalization, linear audio processing comes into play at this point in the process.
  • To produce tonal balance, for instance, you could use an EQ to remove the harsh elements of a vocal recording.
  • This would be one example.
  • If you don’t take care of issues like these before using a compressor, the unwelcome signal energy will excessively impact the results of the compression.

It is recommended that an equalizer be used first, followed by a compressor, while working with audio material that has signal intensities that are distracting to the listener. As an illustration, a recording of a female vocalist will typically have some roughness and low-end rumble.

To get rid of the rumble and create a clean vocal, you would have to remove everything with a frequency below 200 Hz. In addition, begin adjusting the high end above 10 kilohertz in order to get rid of all the harshness and sibilance that is distracting. Alternately, you may use the intelligent filter and the appropriate vocal profile that comes with smart:EQ 3 to clean up the audio that contains the female vocals in a matter of seconds.

After you have finished all of the cleaning up, you may then push the voice by using a compressor.

What are aux buses used for?

An aux bus is a signal path that is auxiliary to the primary audio path of the mixer. This signal path may be found in a mixer. Aux buses are frequently utilized for aux sends and aux returns, but they can also serve as simple supplementary pathways for submixing in certain situations.

What is a bus in recording studio?

I am grateful to you, kind benefactor! Because to your generosity, Wikipedia is able to continue to thrive. You can choose to “hide appeals” to prevent this browser from displaying fundraising messages for one week, or you can return to the appeal to make a donation if you are still interested in doing so.

Please, we beg you, do not scroll away from this page. Hi. Let’s cut to the chase and get to the point: On Thursday, we will be asking for your assistance in maintaining Wikipedia.98% of those who read our site do not donate. Many people have the intention of donating later, but they end up forgetting.

To ensure our continued existence, all we ask for is $2, or anything else you can provide. We beg you, in all modesty, to refrain from scrolling away from this page. If you are one of our very few donors, please accept our sincere gratitude. In the field of audio engineering, a bus (alternative spelling: buss; plural: busses) is a signal path that may be used to combine (sum) several audio signal paths together.

  • Busses can also be referred to by their singular form, bus.
  • Typically, it is used to aggregate many separate audio tracks into a single entity that may then be modified as a group in the same manner as another track.
  • On a mixing console, this may be accomplished by physically routing the signal through the use of switches and cable patching.

Alternatively, this can be accomplished through the manipulation of software capabilities on a digital audio workstation (DAW). The use of busses enables the engineer to operate in a manner that is both more efficient and more consistent. For example, the engineer may apply sound processing effects and alter levels for many tracks at the same time using busses.

What is bus in Pro Tools?

What Exactly Is the Bus? A bus is an internal link inside Pro Tools that may be utilized to transport different combinations of signals, sometimes known as “mixes,” from one location within the mixer to another. If you have never heard of the phrase before, it is important to note that this is not the nomenclature used by Pro Tools, because buses are used for transferring many different types of data in addition to audio.

Since automated downmixing and fanout of channel widths were introduced in Pro Tools version 2021.8, the process of routing channels with varying ‘widths’ (mono, stereo, 5.1, etc.) is now much easier than it was in previous versions. Any channel may be routed to any bus, and any bus can be routed to any channel, eliminating the need for the user to manually manage changes to the channel width.

Additionally, Pro Tools now performs almost everything automatically. The primary output of your session is a bus, therefore even if you don’t think you’ve ever used a bus in a session, the likelihood is high that you have. More will be spoken about this at a later time.

  • If the concept of buses is difficult for you to grasp, taking one yourself is the best way to have a better understanding of how they work.
  • In your sessions, you may make use of buses in the following five ways: 1.
  • Submixes It is possible to bring these tracks together for processing on a shared aux input if you assign tracks that “belong together in some way” (I’m purposefully avoiding using the word group here) to a bus rather than the main output of the mixer.
See also:  How To Play Music On Ft?

This makes it possible to bring these tracks together for processing (or Routing Folder Track). Either for the sake of convenience (because more sources may be processed by fewer plug-ins) or just because doing so results in a distinctive sound, this can be done.

The most glaring illustration of this is the distinction that can be seen when source tracks are compressed separately as opposed to when the source tracks are submixed and the submix itself is compressed using a single compressor. Even if compression is applied to all of the source recordings in each of these cases, the end product has a very distinct tone because of the varied techniques.

There is a common misconception among novice users that the objective of establishing submixes via bussing either through Auxiliary Inputs or Routing folders is to regulate the volume. However, mix groups and VCAs are specifically designed for this task.

  1. Even though you may utilize subgroups to adjust the volume of an audio track, their primary function is to bring many tracks of music together so that they can be processed.
  2. Printing stems is one more highly important use for submixing through buses, and it’s one of them.
  3. Instead of routing via an aux input, one may always route via a bus to an audio track.

This option has always been available. In the “bounce to disk” menu, one can pick different sources in addition to the main output. Additionally, the output of a bus can be bounced in the exact same manner as the main output. Alternately, you may achieve the same outcome by employing the Track Bounce command on the Auxiliary Input or Routing Folder to which a submix is routed.2.

The Effects and Sends of Setting up send-and-return loops for the purpose of exchanging effects between sessions is yet another widespread application of buses. That effect may be spread over as many tracks in your session as you wish if you use sends to route the required signals to the input of a plug-in that is installed on an auxiliary input.3.

Keying Buses may also be used to route signals as external key inputs to side chains in dynamics processors. This is the third purpose for buses. Things have the potential to take an intriguing turn if one signal is used to control a portion of another signal.

  • While Pro Tools uses a traditional approach to side chains and key inputs that mirrors the way these things were done on analogue equipment, we are seeing more and more software that allows audio tracks to modulate almost any parameter rather than just dynamic processors.
  • Pro Tools uses a traditional approach to side chains and key inputs that mirrors the way these things were done on analogue equipment.4.

Using Ctrl to Select Multiple Buses When you begin to make use of auxiliary sends, it doesn’t take long before you realize that a single track may be connected to more than one bus at the same time. It is not too difficult to send a signal to one bus from the main track output selector and another bus from a send if your goal is to have a signal go to many buses at the same time.

Create a post fader send if you want the level going to both buses to follow the main fader; however, if you want them to be independent of one another, create a pre fade send by pressing the blue “Pre” button on the send. This will allow the levels going to both buses to be controlled independently.

The fact that it is possible to assign the main track output to various buses is something that many people are unaware of. This may be accomplished by holding the Control button (or the Start button on Windows) and then assigning to another bus or output.

  1. It will be indicated if numerous outputs have been assigned by the appearance of a “+” symbol in front of the output.
  2. When duplicating an output, use this anyplace you would normally use a post-fade send with the unity setting.
  3. It has been able to choose multiple buses (or inputs/outputs in a single action) in Pro Tools ever since version 2018.7 was released.

This still makes use of the Ctrl key (Start on a PC), but unlike in the past, it is now possible to pick numerous destinations without having to repeatedly revisit the menu. Previously, this was not the case. The current routing is shown by the presence of ticks next to each selected bus.5.

What are aux tracks used for?

One of the track types in Pro Tools, which cannot even be used for recording, is maybe the most adaptable of the bunch. In the column that was published one month ago, we discussed the three types of tracks that are used in Pro Tools sessions to store audio or MIDI recordings: audio, MIDI, and Instrument tracks.

However, there are also several extremely essential track kinds that do not itself include any recorded content. Because of this, let’s continue by looking at the Aux (auxiliary input) track, which is arguably the track type that offers the greatest degree of versatility. A user is able to transport live audio via Pro Tools thanks to the usage of aux tracks.

Except for the fact that you are unable to record any audio onto aux tracks, their functionality is quite similar to that of an audio track. Their uses are quite diverse and many, and include the following: The process of submixing a collection of recordings.

For instance, all of the components of a drum kit that has been multitracked may be routed to an aux track in order to produce a stereo drum mix that only requires one fader to alter its volume. Bringing audio into Pro Tools from hardware synthesizers and drum machines that are being triggered live from Pro Tools MIDI tracks (although it is typically neater to use an Instrument track for this).

Bringing in audio from hardware synths and drum machines. In order to employ sends and returns, auxiliary effects like reverbs and delays must first be set up. Bringing the outputs of external hardware effects inside Pro Tools via routing their returns.

Audio hardware devices like CD players, record decks, and even an external audio mixer can be routed through the system. Developing custom mixes for the performers’ headphones. coordinating extra outputs generated by multitimbral software synthesizers that are placed on an Instrument track. Recording of a drum kit may be seen in the first screen of Pro Tools.

To modify the total volume of the drum set in the mix, what we need to do is establish a subgroup that encompasses the entire kit. This will allow us to utilize the fader that is located on the subgroup channel to make adjustments. To begin, a stereo Aux track has to be created for this project.

  • In this scenario, the ‘OHs’ track should be highlighted as it is located adjacent to the spot where you wish to place the new track.
  • Now pick New from the Track menu or press Command+Shift+N on your keyboard (Windows users should use Ctrl+Shift+N).
  • Select one stereo Aux Input track and then click the OK button after making your selection in the New Tracks menu.

When you choose a track in Pro Tools, an additional Aux track will be added to the right of that track. Perform a double click on the track name of the Auxiliary Input, and then rename it to “Kit Sub.” Screen 1 shows a multitracked recording of a conventional drum set that I have loaded into this Pro Tools session.

At this point, we need to configure the routing so that the Kit Sub channel is used as the conduit for all of the drum kit tracks. What has to happen is that the output of each audio track needs to be routed to the same stereo bus, and then the Kit Sub track needs to have that stereo bus assigned as an input.

It is possible to do this by clicking on the output routing box associated with each track in turn; however, it is far easier to apply the setting to all of the tracks at once. To begin, select all of the tracks for the drum kit by first clicking on the first track (‘kick’), then holding down the Shift key, and finally clicking on the last track for the drum set (‘OHs’).

Now, while changing the output assignment of one track, hold down the Shift key together with the Alt key, and watch as all of the selected tracks move to the bus that you have chosen, which in this case is bus 3/4. (You’ll discover that holding down Shift and Alt applies a change to all chosen tracks across Pro Tools, whereas holding down Alt applies the change to all tracks.) After that, rename bus 3/4 by right-clicking on the output box of one audio track and selecting the Rename option.

Utilizing the context-sensitive menu that just appeared, change the name to “kit sub.” It is important to keep in mind that changing it here will result in a change to the labeling for bus 3/4 everywhere, not just on the track that is now selected. You could navigate to the Buss tab in the I/O Setup window, but doing so is not necessary because this is a much simpler solution.

  1. Simply update the input routing on the Kit Sub Aux Input track to read “kit sub,” and you will be good to go.
  2. You now have a subgroup for all of the songs pertaining to the drum set.
  3. A mixer can control even the most massive mixes using this technology thanks to the submixed Aux channels.
  4. In practice, hundreds of tracks are able to be run through only a few of aux channels at a time.

It’s not uncommon for me to have mixes with 50 tracks running across 10 or fewer submix channels. What Is A Bus In Music Production