Where The Wild Thing Are Music?

Where The Wild Thing Are Music
A listing of the tracks

No. Title Length
1. ‘Igloo’ 1:49
2. ‘All Is Love’ 2:50
3. ‘Capsize’ 2:38
4. ‘Worried Shoes’ 4:12

Nog 10 rijen

Who sang the soundtrack to where the Wild Things are?

References –

  1. Amazon.com features a product with the title “Where the Wild Things Are Soundtrack: Original Songs by Karen O and the Kids.” This page was retrieved on January 6, 2010.
  2. ^ Continue on to: a b Heather, yours, Phares. AllMusic has a listing titled “Where the Wild Things Are – Karen O & the Kids, Karen O.” This page was retrieved on October 7, 2017.
  3. Rolling Stone published an article with the title “Karen O and the Kids: The Rockers of “Where the Wild Things Are”” on August 19, 2009. This page was retrieved on October 7, 2017.
  4. Charles McNair’s Name: (September 15, 2009). The title of this article is “An Interview With Karen O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.” Paste, This page was retrieved on April 11, 2015.
  5. Interscope Records, “Where the Wild Things Are: Releases: All Is Love,” (accessed April 19, 2019). You may get the original document from March 23, 2012 here. This page was retrieved on January 6, 2010.
  6. ^ Continue on to: a b “Reviews as well as Tracks for Karen O and the Kids’s Where the Wild Things Are” Metacritic, This page was retrieved on October 7, 2017.
  7. * Emma Johnston (February 2010). “Where the Wild Things Are – Karen O & The Kids – Original Motion Picture Soundtrack” Classic Rock, Volume 141, Number 141, Page 85 ISSN 1464-7834,
  8. ^ Lukowski, Andrzej (September 30, 2009). “Where the Wild Things Are Original Motion Picture Soundtrack Featuring Karen O and the Kids” Suffocated by the Sound. The original document was saved on October 4, 2009 and can be accessed here. This page was retrieved on January 6, 2010.
  9. ^ Vozick-Levinson, Simon (October 2, 2009). “Where the Wild Things Are,” Entertainment Weekly, number 1068, ISSN 1049-0434. “Where the Wild Things Are.” This page was retrieved on October 7, 2017.
  10. ^ Chinen, Nate (September 25, 2009). “Sets that are Mature and Focused, With Breaks for Some Time to Play” The New York Times. This page was retrieved on January 6, 2010.
  11. ^ Berman, Stuart (October 8, 2009). Pitchfork titled their review of the album “Karen O and the Kids: Where the Wild Things Are OST.” This page was retrieved on January 6, 2010.
  12. ^ Dolan, Jon (October 13, 2009). Original songs written and performed by Karen O and the Kids were included on the Where the Wild Things Are soundtrack. Rolling Stone, You are viewing a version of this page that was archived on April 14, 2010. This page was retrieved on January 6, 2010.
  13. * Jonathan Keefe (October 4, 2009). Slant magazine had an article titled “Karen O and the Kids: Where the Wild Things Are.” This page was retrieved on October 7, 2017.
  14. ^ Kandall, Steve (October 7, 2009). The lead singer of Yeah Yeah Yeahs unleashes her inner tomboy in a new music video. Spin, This version was archived on October 9, 2009 and can be accessed here. This page was retrieved on January 6, 2010.
  15. “Official Soundtrack Albums Chart Top 50” “Official Soundtrack Albums Chart” Official Charts Company. Official Charts. The data was retrieved on October 7th, 2017.
  16. Retrieved on October 7, 2017 from “Karen O Chart History” (Billboard 200), which was published by Billboard.
  17. Billboard.com, “Karen O Chart History (Soundtrack Albums),” The data was retrieved on October 7th, 2017.
  18. Billboard.com, “Karen O Chart History: Top Alternative Albums.” The data was retrieved on October 7th, 2017.
  19. Billboard.com, “Karen O Chart History: Top Rock Albums.” The data was retrieved on October 7th, 2017.
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Who is the author of where the Wild Things are?

Where the Wild Things Are is a children’s picture book that was first published in 1963 by Harper & Row and was written and illustrated by American author and illustrator Maurice Sendak.

What is the name of the piano in where the Wild Things are?

References –

  1. “Where the Wild Things Are” is the name of the book. Auctions run by Heritage Auctions. This page was retrieved on July 16, 2021.
  2. The title of the book “Where the Wild Things Are.” Catalog Records, Library of Congress
  3. Harper & Row
  4. Year Published: 1963 Retrieved on the 17th of June, 2013.
  5. Jump to: a, b, c, or d Turan, Kenneth (October 16, 2009). “Where the Wild Things Are” is the name of the book. Los Angeles Times, retrieved on the 12th of February, 2012.
  6. ALSC, American Library Association, “Caldecott Medal & Honor Books, 1938-Present.” Association for Library Service to Children. This page was retrieved on June 19, 2013. The Randolph Caldecott Medal is awarded annually by the American Library Association and the Association for Library Service to Children. This page was retrieved on May 27, 2009.
  7. ^ Continue on to: a b “The Best Children’s Picture Books of All Time” (PDF).2012 edition of School Library Journal. A poster display of the results of the reader vote. This version was archived on November 23, 2016, from the original (PDF). Retrieved on the 17th of June, 2013.
  8. Go back one level: a.b.c. Warrick, Pamela (October 11, 1993). “Facing the Frightful Things” is the title of the book. Los Angeles Times, This page was retrieved on August 27, 2009.
  9. —- Christopher Shea (October 16, 2009). The Jewish roots of the novel “Where the Wild Things Are” The Boston Globe is being used. Brainiac, This page was retrieved on January 28, 2012.
  10. The Traditional Fine Arts Organization had an exhibition titled “Wild Things: The Art of Maurice Sendak” on April 26, 2005. This page was retrieved on August 28, 2009.
  11. Jump to: a, b, c, or d Brockes, Emma (October 2, 2011). “Maurice Sendak: ‘I Refuse to Lie to Children’ ” is the title of this article. The Guardian (magazine). This page was retrieved on October 5, 2011.
  12. Jump to: a, b, c, or d Edited by Tom Burns (March 2008). “Maurice Sendak”, Evaluation of Books Intended for Children Detroit, MI: Gale.131: 70. ISBN 978-0-7876-9606-1, OCLC 792604122,
  13. Continue reading at: a b Lehmann-Haupt, Christopher (June 1, 1981). It’s called “Book Of The Times.” The New York Times. This page was retrieved on October 12, 2009.
  14. “Maurice Sendak’s Trilogy: Disappointment, Fury, and Their Transformation through Art,” written by Richard M. Gottlieb and published in 2008. Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, volume 63, pages 186–217, doi: 10.1080/00797308.2008.11800804, ISBN 978-0-300-14099-6, PMID 19449794, and S2CID 25420037.
  15. — Gregory Maguire (December 2003). The Horn Book Magazine, Volume 79, Issue 79, “A Sendak Appreciation” (6).
  16. Poushali Bhadury, Bhadury (April 2011). “Critical Approaches to Food in Children’s Literature”. “Critical Approaches to Food”. The Lion and the Unicorn, volume 35, number 2, pages 189–194, with a DOI number of 10.1353/uni.2011.0013 and an S2CID number of 145308185.
  17. ^ Pols, Mary (October 14, 2009). Sendak’s sensitivity is seen in the book “Where the Wild Things Are.” Time, Retrieved on September 21, 2011, from the archive of the original document. This page was retrieved on October 18, 2009.
  18. ^ Jump up to: a b Kakutani, Michiko (May 16, 2017). “The Foundations of an Individual Imagination.” The New York Times.
  19. ^ Heneghan, Liam —> a.b.c. Heneghan, Liam (April 30, 2018). It is necessary for our imaginations to reside in the places where wild things are found. The Literary Hub. : CS1 maint: url-status ( link )
  20. ^ Sendak, Maurice (October 16, 2009). “Review: Where the Wild Things Are Is Woolly, But Not Wild Enough (Sendak Says Wild Things Film as Feral as Book)”, compiled and edited by Hugh Hart. www.wired.com. The information was retrieved on December 30, 2009.
  21. — Francis Spufford (2002). Reading over a Lifetime: The Child That Books Created (1st ed.). Metropolitan Books, located in New York City, page number 60. ISBN 978-0-8050-7215-0, OCLC 50034806,
  22. ^ Dargis, Manohla (October 16, 2009). It’s true that some of his closest friends are animals. The New York Times. This page was retrieved on October 16, 2009.
  23. “The Top 100 Children’s Books According to Teachers” 2007 report published by the National Education Association. retrieved on the 22nd of August, 2012.
  24. ^ Bird, Elizabeth (July 2, 2012). Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak is ranked number one on the list of the top 100 picture books. Journal of the School Library Association. Retrieved on the 17th of June, 2013.
  25. The name Handy, Bruce (October 9, 2009). The title of the book is “Where the Wild Things Weren’t.” ISSN 0362-4331 is the number assigned to The New York Times. This page was retrieved on December 6, 2021.
  26. ^ Stevenson, Deborah (June 1996). “Frightening the children? : Kids, grown-ups, and frightening picture books,” is the title of a recent article. The Horn Book Magazine, 72nd Edition, Number 3: 305.
  27. ^ Sutton, Roger (November 2003). “A Conversation with the Illustrator Maurice Sendak”. The Horn Book Magazine, issue number 79 (6).
  28. Erin Carlson’s name is cited here (January 25, 2012). In an interview with The Colbert Report, author Maurice Sendak referred to former House Speaker Newt Gingrich as a “idiot.” A report from The Hollywood Reporter. The Live Streaming. Retrieved on the 21st of February, 2012.
  29. January 13, 2020: “These Are the Top Check Outs of ALL TIME at the NYPL.”
  30. ^ Johnston, Russell (March 12, 2009). Nashville, the scene from ‘Bach in Black’ 46 is the page number of The Tennessean.
  31. ^ Wakin, Daniel J. (March 10, 2010). Bernstein, Strauss, and New Works Will Be Performed During the New York City Opera Season The New York Times. This page was retrieved on March 19, 2013.
  32. ^ Amidi, Amid (February 23, 2011). Experiments in early computer graphics created by John Lasseter and Glen Keane Cartoon Concoction This page was retrieved on June 19, 2013.
  33. AllMusic.com published an article titled “Active Imagination (Solo Piano)” on December 28, 1998. The article was retrieved on March 12, 2012.
  34. Nicole Sperling (Sperling) (September 11, 2008). The much-anticipated film “Where the Wild Things Are” now has a release date, as reported by Entertainment Weekly and Inside Movies, respectively. This version was archived on September 21, 2019 and can be accessed here. The article was retrieved on September 12, 2008.
  35. ^ Podplesky, Azaria (December 18, 2012). alt-J recruits Maurice Sendak and a woman who looks like Kate Middleton for the “Breezeblocks” music video. Weekly Digest of Seattle This version was archived on July 8, 2017 from the original. This page was retrieved on June 10, 2013.
  36. “ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2013 Singles” “ARIA Charts – Accreditations” association representing the Australian recording industry This page was retrieved on March 19, 2013.
  37. Alessia Cara has been quoted as saying that “Wild Things” is “Just Really an Empowering Song.” News Radio from ABC April 26, 2016, This page was retrieved on January 28, 2017.
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What is the theme of where the Wild Things are?

The youngsters in the narrative Where the Wild Things Are are shown to have “spirit” and “pluck,” which are both examples of how resilient children can be. By employing “the magic method of looking into all their yellow eyes without blinking once,” Max is able to overcome the Wild Things and their “awful fangs” and “terrible claws.”